Section 97.115 of the Commission Rules, 47 C.F.R., §97.115, authorizes an FCC-regulated amateur station to transmit a message from its control operator (first party) to another amateur station control operator (second party) on behalf of another person (third party). However, no amateur station may send messages for third parties to a station under the jurisdiction of a foreign government whose management has not entered into an agreement with the United States to permit the use of amateur stations for the transmission of international communications on behalf of third parties. Part 97.3 (47) defines communication with third parties as „a message sent by the control operator (first party) of an amateur station to another amateur station control operator (second party) on behalf of another person (third party)“. In the absence of agreement between countries, amateur broadcasters often have to apply for a mutual operating licence or a full amateur radio licence and a call signal from the host country. Some countries may accept foreign amateur radio licences as proof of qualification instead of examination requirements[1], while other host countries may unilaterally grant mutual privileges without the need for an additional licence. In recent years, the FCC has amended Part 97 to determine how and where digital stations with automatic control can be operated to avoid harmful disruptions to other stations. Automatically controlled digital station is the FCC term for an unmonitored digital station that transmits messages to and from the Internet. (G1E11) Self-controlled stations that transmit RTTY or data broadcasts can communicate with other self-controlled digital stations anywhere in the 1.25-metre or shorter wavelength bands and in some segments of the 80-2 metre bands. (G1E13) The station causing the contact must be controlled locally or remotely to communicate with a digital station that operates under automatic control outside the automatic control band segments.

(G1E03) Under no circumstances are messages sent by digital modes exempt from the rules of Part 97 of Part 97, which apply to other modes of communication. (G1E12) According to FCC rules, you cannot provide third-party traffic to another country unless there is an agreement between the United States and the other country. From the FCC website: I didn`t think that was entirely accurate. I thought a third party was someone who manages the station, except the station licensor or the control operator. But when I was getting ready to write it, I thought I needed to make sure better. Luckily I did because I think the answer is the right one. I am in the United States and intend to demonstrate HF from a group of unlicensed children and adults at a family event this weekend. . . .